Trespassing in Sarasota

The state of Florida defines criminal trespass as entering private property without authorization, or re-entering private property after given a warning not to do so. There are several different categories of criminal trespass, including trespassing on school grounds, trespassing on property, and trespassing in a structure or conveyance. Depending on the situation, these crimes can range from second-degree misdemeanors to felonies. If you have been charged with criminal trespass, it’s important to seek out an experienced Sarasota trespassing attorney at Pallegar Law, P.A. to represent you. We are your go to Sarasota Criminal Defense Attorneys.

Misdemeanor Trespassing

Criminal trespass is a misdemeanor when it occurs on real property, or in a structure or conveyance. The crime occurs when you enter private property without being invited or otherwise authorized. Criminal trespass on property also occurs when you enter adjacent land or grounds with the intent to commit a crime. In the state of Florida, trespass on property is a first-degree misdemeanor. If you are convicted of this crime, you face up to one year in jail, probation, and fines of up to $1,000. This crime can be upgraded if you are armed with a dangerous weapon, hunting an endangered animal, or are entering a construction or agricultural site.

Criminal trespass in a structure or conveyance occurs when you enter a structure or conveyance without authorization or invitation, or refuse to exit such property after being ordered to. For classification purposes, a structure is defined as a temporary or permanent building with a roof. A conveyance is defined as a ship, vessel, railroad car, trailer, or any motor vehicle. If the structure or conveyance is not occupied, the crime is a second-degree misdemeanor. If you are convicted, you may face up to 60 days in jail, six months of probation, and fines of up to $500.

If you trespass in an occupied structure or conveyance, the crime is upgraded to a first-degree misdemeanor. This crime is punishable by one year in jail, one year of probation, and fines of up to $1,000. If you are in possession of a dangerous weapon, the crime is upgraded to a felony.

Criminal trespass on school grounds occurs when you enter a school campus or facility without legitimate authorization or invitation, or if you are a student who has been suspended or expelled. Criminal trespass on school grounds is a second-degree misdemeanor that can be upgraded if you are armed with a dangerous weapon. If you or someone you know has been charged with criminal trespass, contact an aggressive Sarasota trespass attorney who specializes in criminal cases at Pallegar Law, P.A.

Felony Trespassing

Most trespassing charges are misdemeanors, but can be upgraded to felonies if you possess a firearm or other dangerous weapon. Armed trespass on school grounds is a third-degree felony, punishable by five years in jail, five years of probation, and fines of up to $5,000. Criminal trespass on property becomes a felony if you are armed with a dangerous weapon, hunting an endangered animal, or if you have entered a construction or agricultural site with posted warnings. This crime is considered third-degree felony. Armed trespass in a structure or conveyance is also a third-degree felony, punishable by five years in jail, five years of probation, and fines of up to $5,000. There are many defenses to criminal trespass, and hiring a knowledgeable Sarasota trespassing lawyer will help you build a strong defense.

Call Pallegar Law, P.A. Today

If you have been charged with criminal trespass, call an experienced Sarasota trespassing attorney at Pallegar Law, P.A. Call 941-893-5816 for your free consultation.

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